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Pennsylvania’s Constitution mandates the General Assembly shall provide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient system of public education to serve the needs of the Commonwealth.

The Commonwealth currently works to fulfill this obligation by spending nearly $28 Billion in federal, state and local tax moneys in support of education: $856 a second.

However, colleges and universities, employers, and the military constantly tell us high school graduates aren’t ready to meet the challenges of higher education and the workforce.

While I believe school choice would address this lack of results, while also helping students and parents, many fear choice.

Jenny Bradmon, John Callahan and I are exploring one aspect of school choice: cyber charter school funding. Jenny Bradmon is the Executive Director of Pennsylvania Families for Public Cyber Schools, and John Callahan is Senior Director of Government Affairs for the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.

Article III, Section 14 of Pennsylvania’s Constitution calls for:  “The General Assembly shall provide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient system of public education to serve the needs of the Commonwealth.”

Fulfilling this requirement requires navigating complex and often controversial issues.

The following is an attempt to review both sides of the ongoing cyber charter school debate.  White papers from each are included as well.

Jenny Bradmon and PA Families for Public Cyber Schools